Curating; or, building the manuscript index

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about getting started with turning a dissertation into a book, including researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. Then, at the end of the revision process and on the cusp of drafting new content, I wrote on the strategies for revision I had found most useful, seeming an appropriate moment to reflect on what exactly the revision process looks like. Such nuts-and-bolts queries I have found difficult to pin down from those who do have books, as well as in all the metaliterature, so I decided to document them here while I take time off from my normal reviewing.

I am happy to say the draft manuscript is in for final review! In that grey time of the holidays where all one can do is wait and hope, I have a pair of posts reflecting on the process driven by data I collected each step of the way. In this post, I offer a process to tackle the dreaded index, whose compiling has greatly changed in the wake of new Style tools in MS Word and Google Docs. This is something I realized you can totally do for yourself without a tremendous amount of labor or farming the task out to an inexperienced (grad) student.

It’s alive! The manuscript lives together in print for the first time. October 1, 2019.
Continue reading “Curating; or, building the manuscript index”

‘Membering; or, strategies for book revisions

Back in early 2018, I composed a series of blog posts about researching the publishing process, targeting series, oft-circulated myths, and, in five parts, how to fund it. I am now two-thirds through my own revision process before final submission, having just finished those elements for which content existed. The introduction and afterword remain. It seemed an appropriate moment to reflect on what exactly the revision process looks like—a nuts-and-bolts query I have found it difficult to pin down those who do have books about.

In the vein of my previous reflection on the first-book process, in this post I write on the tactics that have made up my repertoire of revising my thesis into a book: to collate, section, and cut-and-paste; to polish page-by-page; to rely on surefooted tools Scrivener and Zotero; and to track. Of course everyone’s processes are different, and different kinds of projects also necessitate unique approaches.

For me, in the heat of it, revising is an act of dismembering and remembering.

Continue reading “‘Membering; or, strategies for book revisions”