Round-up of 2018

Here is a purr of fortune’s, sir, or of fortune’s 
cat — but not a musk-cat — that has fallen into the 
unclean fishpond of her displeasure, and, as he 
says, is muddied withal: pray you, sir, use the 
carp as you may; for he looks like a poor, decayed, 
ingenious, foolish, rascally knave. I do pity his 
distress in my similes of comfort and leave him to 
your lordship.

— Clown, All’s Well That Ends Well

It has truly been a fortunate year. From my brother’s wedding to a brilliant research trip tp the Huntington Library, not to mention a relatively dry and warm fall and winter in Portland, I am sure I’m at the zenith of Fortune’s Wheel, and so steady myself for rougher waters ahead. In reflection on a great deal of good news and satisfying work, this post cobbles together a few year-end notes.

Just a few of my favorite things I saw this year, including Everybody and Magellanica (Artists Repertory Theatre); Henry V, Romeo & Juliet, and Snow in Midsummer (Oregon Shakespeare Festival); Strangest Yellow (Fertile Ground Festival); Wakey Wakey (Portland Playhouse); Uncle Vanya (PETE); Macbeth (Shaking the Tree); Silent Sky (Pacific University); and She is Fierce (Enso Theatre).
Continue reading “Round-up of 2018”

“Feast here awhile”: Shakespeare for a Portland Autumn

Dear readers:

According to American Theatre magazine, “Shakespeare remains the most-produced playwright in the country, with 108 productions (including various adaptations). And this year his most-produced play will be Twelfth Night with 9 productions.” In fact, Shakespeare in Love was the most produced play of the year, with 15 full-scale professional productions nation-wide. This does not take into account all of the Shakespeare-ish works making the rounds to be excited for, including the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged) and Emma Whipday’s Shakespeare’s Sister. If you are in the Portland area this fall, there are a couple of exciting productions to keep your eyes peeled for.

Pericles Wet

This December, Portland Shakespeare Project will be producing a full-scale run of my colleague, Ellen Margolis’ adaptation of Pericles, Prince of Tyre. Based on the act printed in a recent issue of Proscenium and a reading I saw last year, this is likely to prove special. This re-magining refocuses on the assault of Princess Hesperides and the framing device of Gower.

Continue reading ““Feast here awhile”: Shakespeare for a Portland Autumn”